Race Recap: Turtleman Triathlon 2018

Josh Finish Line

When I scaled-back my registration from Olympic to Sprint at the Minneapolis Triathlon earlier this month, I knew I’d need to call an audible within a few short weeks. I’d need to insert another race into the schedule and get longer distance experience under my belt prior to the USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships. The Turtleman Triathlon in Shoreview, MN would be my audible.

Pre-Race

Almost everything about this race was new to me. This would be my first time racing Turtleman. My first Olympic distance race (technically the swim is a little longer here – 1.1 mile vs 0.93 miles, and the run shorter – 5 miles vs 6.2 miles). My first time seeing this specific course. So since it as all new to me, I just focused on staying relaxed and taking it all in on race morning. I found a comfortable spot in transition (first come, first served), racked my bike and laid out my gear. I walked down to the beach and got my first look at Turtle Lake. I stretched. I maintained a balance of calm and excitement. Maybe the biggest surprise this season has been my sense of calm on race mornings. Even with all the unknowns on this specific race morning, nothing worried me. I was ready to tackle whatever came my way. And welcomed the challenge.

Swim

This was probably the best swim of my career. It’s hard to really say how it compares in regards to time and speed since this was my first Olympic distance. But in regards to how I felt, it was by far the best. Here’s what I mean. I didn’t have the slightest thought of panic — for the entire one mile swim. I didn’t question if I could do it or not — for the entire one mile swim. I didn’t stop to take breaks or catch my breath — for the entire one mile swim. My swimming struggles over the last three years have been well documented on this blog. Heck, I had a huge panic attack during the Trinona quarter-mile swim just two months ago. To conquer this one-mile swim with a sense of calm and strength is a point of immense pride.

Josh Swim Exit

Swim exit zipper struggles: proof that not all race photos are glorious and graceful.

Bike

This is where the wheels fell off. Not literally, but also not that far off. Exiting T1 was anything but graceful. The race director warned us all during the pre-race meeting that there was a hill immediately after crossing the mount line. She wasn’t kidding. I saw others in front of me struggling to mount on an incline. I clipped-in to my left pedal, pushed off and upwards, and threw my right leg over the frame towards my right pedal. But I missed the clip and my foot slipped. I couldn’t keep the bike rolling uphill with just one leg. And in slow motion, I tipped over, crashing to the ground, with one water bottle falling out and rolling backwards down the hill. Definitely not my greatest of race moments. I scraped-up my knee pretty good, took a gouge out of the skin on my ankle bone and got a few cuts on my hand. A very generous volunteer grabbed my water bottle and ran it up to me — otherwise I probably would’ve ditched it. I noticed a few athletes behind me must’ve said “F it” after seeing me fall and they ran their bikes to the top of the hill, mounting their bikes there. I did the same, ran my bike to the top, made my second mount attempt and got to rolling.

I quickly heard a fluttering sound from my front spokes. Oh great, did I break something in the fall? I pulled-over and noticed my bike computer sensors got twisted. The wheel sensor was out of alignment and the fork sensor was shifted. I made some adjustments and got back to spinning. No dice. No data on the computer screen. I rode for about a mile, struggling with a decision of if I should pullover again, or keep going without the computer. I really didn’t want to lose more time than I already had, but ultimately, I opted to pullover. The speed and mileage data were just too important to efficiency, power utilization, and most importantly — my peace of mind. I adjusted the sensors, pushed-off and started pedaling. Again, no dice. So I went the entire 25 miles without and speed or mileage data. Not ideal, but sometimes things happen. And you just have to roll with it. Luckily, there were mile-markers about every four miles along the course. Could be worse.

Josh Bike

Rolling with the punches.

Run

Finally — the run. My favorite part of the race. This was my first time running after 25 miles in the saddle. I wasn’t quite sure how my legs would respond, but I tore out of transition determined to find out. Well, that quick sprint was short-lived due to a truck and boat trailer pulling-out across the run entrance. This was definitely a first for me — a transition area open to traffic. I wasn’t the only runner mumbling a few choice words under my breath. But after a few seconds, I was back on the course and it didn’t take too much longer than usual to shake out the legs. A stomach cramp set in after the first mile and stuck with me for another two miles, which wasn’t pleasant at all. I kept thinking my calm thoughts and stayed focused on the runner in front of me, trying to pass them and then focusing on the next runner. I just kept on running and didn’t let up.

Results

My Turtleman 2018 Results

Split

Split Pace

Age Rank

Overall Rank

Swim (1.1 miles)

00:33:44

4/17

21/89

T1

00:02:28

Bike (25 miles)

01:20:17

16.10 mi/hr

13/17

53/89

T2

00:01:54

Run (5 miles)

00:36:18

07:16 min/mile

3/17

9/89

Total

02:34:39

7/17

25/89

Reflection

I did it. I finished my first Olympic-ish triathlon. It started out strong, got rough in the middle, then shifted back to positive for a strong finish. Strong enough for a top-ten run too!

That rough patch in the middle — the bike debacle — really threw me for a loop. The fall was one thing. But then to be down on equipment added insult to injury. Literally. But as I mentioned earlier, things happen. And sometimes they’re out of our control. We can’t change that it happened; we can only control our response. I chose to keep going. It was a little frustrating in the moment, but now it’s a story I can look back on and say “I did that silly thing, I got back up and finished the race.”

My back held-up fairly strong in this race too. It had only been three weeks prior that I bulged a disc bending over to light a campfire. And here I was swimming, biking and running my longest combined distance yet. You could definitely say I’m a believer in the powers of physical therapy for getting me back to health this quickly.

Now I turn my sights to the biggest race of my life to date: USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships.

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Challenge & Opportunity Ahead

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Two weeks have passed since my podium-topping age group finish at Trinona. I took two days off of training afterwards to rest and soak in the accomplishment. Then I got right back to it. New challenges and opportunities loom on the summer’s horizon.

So what’s first? Swimming. More swimming. Considering my panic attack 200 yards into the Trinona swim, I still have plenty of work to do as I gear-up for longer distance events this summer. Knocking-out more laps in the pool is one option, but I really wanted get out in the open water more. So I joined the the Minneapolis Open Water Swim Club. Being a part of this club gives me the opportunity to swim a lifeguarded course across Lake Nokomis and back three times per week, and at Cedar Lake twice per week. It’s perfect practice for the step-up in distance that I’ll be tackling this summer.

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A successful 0.75 mile swim across Lake Nokomis and back!

In another attempt to strengthen my swimming-related mental-toughness, I signed-up for the Lake Monster 1-2-3 swim race on Saturday, July 7 at Lake Nokomis. This event offers one, two and three mile distances — I opted for the one mile event. This will be the same distance as my first Olympic/International distance triathlon that occurs exactly one week later on the same lake. I’m a little fearful that participating in this event provides an opportunity for another panic attack that would undoubtedly carry over into the next weekend. But more so, I see this as an opportunity to face that fear head-on, come out on the other side stronger from the challenge and be even more prepared for my first attempt at a longer distance triathlon.

Speaking of that next race, I’ll be competing in the Life Time Tri Minneapolis Triathlon on Saturday, July 14 at Lake Nokomis. This will be my third time competing at this event, but it will be my very first attempt at an Olympic/International distance triathlon (0.93 mile swim, 24.5 mile bike, 6.2 mile run), which is twice the distance of a sprint tri. Doing something for the first time is always a little scary. It’s also a chance to step outside the comfort zone and find out what I’m capable of. And I’ll be full of motivation and inspiration for this event, competing as part of Team Save the Children, raising funds and awareness for the amazing work they do to protect and nurture kiddos around the globe.

Save the Children helps innocent children gain access to education, health care and nutrition while fighting to save them from poverty, discrimination and violence. I’d be honored if you joined me in my journey for positive impact. Together, we can help make a child’s life happier, healthier and safer. Together, we can be the difference. Please consider making a donation and visit my personal fundraising page today: www.savethechildren.org/minneapolistri18/joshaverbeck

And last, but not least, there’s plenty of logistical planning and training to do throughout the rest of July and into August. Last week I received my official qualification notification and invitation to the USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships in Cleveland, Ohio. I’ll be registering for the Olympic/International distance, which is an invite-only race that I qualified for by winning my age group at Trinona (there is also a sprint distance event the following day which has open registration). The top 18 finishers in each age group at this event will earn the opportunity to represent the United States at the 2019 ITU World Championships in Switzerland. I don’t know that I’m quite on that level yet, but I’m absolutely honored and thrilled to have the opportunity to compete against some of the best triathletes in the country!

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The dividends of hard work and continuous effort.

Race Recap: Trinona 2018

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Sometimes, when you’re struggling and think things are going downhill fast, you manage to persevere and find that in fact, it’s gotten much better than you could’ve imagined. While I didn’t achieve my aggressive finish time goal, I did best my 2017 time by more than two minutes and took first place in my age group with a time of 01:12:09 — my first time on the top of the podium. Better yet, that first place age group finish qualified me for the 2018 USA Triathlon National Championships in Cleveland, Ohio!

Pre-Race

This was probably the most relaxed I’ve been on race morning. I woke up at 2:30am, ate my pre-race breakfast of peanut butter toast and yogurt with fruit, went back to bed, woke-up at 5:15am, got ready, packed-up the gear and drove down to Lake Winona. It had rained most of the prior evening and was still sprinkling as I parked the truck and rode my bike to transition.

Transition was rather tight on space as it always is. I found a spot on my age groups’s rack, parked the bike and started prepping my gear for the race ahead.

I originally planned on skipping the wetsuit for the 0.25 mile swim, but then started to change my mind as I saw many other sprint distance athletes putting theirs on. The water temp was 72.5°F that morning, a few days colder than measured just a few days prior. The air temp was in the low to mid 60’s. And then I remembered how cold Lake Zumbro was the weekend before. With just a few minutes before transition closed, I quickly applied some body glide, grabbed my wetsuit and joined the pack walking down to the swim start.

The Swim

The swim started out strong. I ran into the lake and dove under the water. I had a strong stroke and started passing those in front of me. I wasn’t thinking about anything except swimming hard. I made it to the first tetrahedron, turned the corner, sighted the long straightaway ahead and kept on swimming.

Then came the panic attack I feared. I looked up to make sure I was still on course and noticed how far away the final tetrahedron was that signaled the final turn back into shore. At that moment I realized the restricted my vision felt within the goggles. I started thinking about how tight my wetsuit felt (which it really wasn’t but my brain was stretching for more reasons of doubt). I did the breast stroke, caught my breath, then put my head back in the water and restarted the freestyle. Then I starting thinking how my momentum was gone and wondered how I’d get back into rhythm. I stopped again. It was like I was floating outside of my body, watching myself tread water and telling myself, “You’re blowing it dude. That aggressive swim goal – gone. That aggressive overall race goal – likely going down the drain less than a few minutes into the race. You’re throwing away this race and all you’ve worked for.” I did my best to fight the doubt with calm thoughts. And I remembered I’m not a quitter.

Somehow I pulled it together, completed the swim and found myself back on land running towards T1. Surprisingly I still had a faster swim time than last year.

Transition One

T1 certainly wasn’t my worst ever, but it was far from my best. I had a feeling it would be a little slow given I opted to wear the wetsuit for the swim, which meant I had to wriggle my way back out of it now. I never did buy clip-in cycling shoes, so I had to sit down and tie my running shoes. I threw on my sunglasses, strapped my helmet and thought I was was ready to go. Then my bike got caught in the rack. The weight of the other bikes sagged the top bar, making it difficult to get my 60cm frame out. I had to twist it vertically in order to get the seat under and out. And with that I was running and rolling the bike towards the mount line.

The Bike

I knew this was going to be a grind. It’s the sport I train in the least. But after a rough swim and T1, I knew I needed to put my head down and pedal. I pedaled as hard as I could for 11 miles. Legs burning but still turning. Their were a couple small climbs that I really pushed myself with, but otherwise it was fairly uneventful.

Transition Two

Remember when I said in my last post that it would be hard to beat my 00:00:57 T2 from 2017 and the pressure would be on to just maintain that? Well I was wrong. I bested it by nine seconds, clocking a time of 00:00:48. Not needing to change bike shoes for running shoes has a lot to do with that speed.

The Run

My favorite part of the entire race if the final run. It’s my strong suit. Within the first few paces on the pavement, I felt a dull, aching pain in the bottom of my left foot (I later realized I must’ve cut it on a rock while running into the lake at the swim start). I jumbled with resetting my watch and failed to notice any mile markers. I had no clue how fast I was or wasn’t running. So I just ran. I set my sights on the person in front of me and tried to pass them. Then I looked at the next person and tried to pass them. That trend continued. The pain in left foot numbed after awhile. I hit the halfway turnaround point, flipped my hat backwards let and made sure the pedal was to the floor for the remainder of the run. I rounded the corner off the paved path and onto the back half of Lake Park Drive with a big smile on my face. The finish chute was in sight. I heard the cheers from friends and family. I crossed the finish line of my fourth Ttinona. And at 00:22:13 (07:10/mile) it was the ninth fastest run time of the race!

My Trinona 2018 Results

Split

Split Pace

Age Group Rank

Overall Rank

Swim (0.25 miles)

00:08:05

02:01 min/100m

3/14

43/260

T1

00:03:13

10/14

158/260

Bike (11miles)

00:37:52

17.44 mi/hr

5/14

73/260

T2

00:00:48

1/14

6/260

Run (3.1 miles)

00:22:13

07:10 min/mi

2/14

9/260

Total

01:12:09

1/14

34/260

Reflection

In 2017, when I realized I missed the podium by just 16 seconds, it really lit a fire within me. I was so close to the podium. That was when it really sunk in that maybe I was on to something here. Triathlon was becoming more than a hobby. I was getting good at it and still tapping into potential. I wanted that podium.

I’d hoped 2018 would be my best Trinona performance yet — it certainly was that and then some. Sure, I missed my aggressive finish time goal of 01:09:00 by a little more than three minutes, but I still got a course PR with 01:12:09 and bested my 2017 time by two minutes and ten seconds. This was my first time on top of the podium with a first place age group finish. And qualifying for a spot at the 2018 USA Triathlon National Championships was icing on the cake. I think the achievement of it all is still sinking in.

My Trinona Time Comparison

Trinona 2014

Trinona 2016

Trinona 2017

Trinona 2018

Swim (0.25 miles)

00:11:29

00:09:27

00:08:19

00:08:05

T1

00:04:44

00:04:07

00:02:35

00:03:13

Bike (11miles)

00:45:35

00:43:40

00:38:50

00:37:52

T2

00:01:21

00:01:07

00:00:57

00:00:48

Run (3.1 miles)

00:27:01

00:27:54

00:23:39

00:22:13

Total

01:30:25

01:26:13

01:14:19

01:12:09

Reflecting back on the race, two moments really stand out. This first was the panic attack in water within the first 200 yards. The out of body vision, watching myself stand still, telling myself I was throwing away everything I had worked hard for. I had a choice — either get stuck in the doubting mindset, or dig deep and power through the fear. I chose the latter and made it to the swim exit and back onto land. The other was crossing the mount line and saddling-in to my bike. At this moment I knew I had a rough swim and a very slow T1. At this moment I knew those two things were in the past. I couldn’t change them. But I could put my head down and channel everything I had into my legs and leave absolutely everything out on the bike and run course. I could’ve let up or given up after what I thought was a race-breaking swim and T1. But I didn’t. I battled back and came out on top of the podium. Yeah, I’m pretty damn proud of that.

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Picking up the Pace

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The last 20 days have been much more productive than the previous 50, which is a huge plus considering Trinona is tomorrow. Yep, my first triathlon of the season is less than 12 hours away. And unlike 20 days ago, I’m feeling ready.

The Last 20 Days

OpenWaterSwim

The biggest news here is that I actually got back in the pool — something I hadn’t done in the 50 days prior. I knocked-out a few quality lap sessions at the gym and even worked-in an open water swim last weekend. I’m unsure of the water temp during that open water session, but the air temp was only 63°F, so that’s enough proof for me to reinforce how cold the Lake Zumbro water felt. My heart rate was spiked and my lungs were working extra — it was the solid kick in the butt that I needed one week before Trinona.

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Cycling took a backseat with the new focus on swimming and continued focus on running, but it didn’t go without a few strong rides. The highlight was a 29.3 mile ride around Lake Minnetonka and the surrounding area with two friends who are much stronger cyclists than I. They pushed me harder than I would’ve rode on my own. Again, exactly what I needed heading into tri season.

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The biggest change in running was the time of day I did it. I traded pounding the pavement under the afternoon sun for a 4:20am alarm to run under the fading moonlight, which opened-up time for cycling or swimming after work. The running highlight came just a few days ago, running 5.4 miles at a 07:05/mile pace during a rare afternoon run. That gave me a confidence boost for what I hope is a strong run tomorrow.

Trinona Preview

I’m hoping to make this my strongest Trinona performance yet. My times have gotten progressively better in each my previous three finishes at this event, including just missing the podium in my age group by 16 seconds last year. That’s left me hungry and wanting more for 2018.

While I had some gaps in my training over the last two months, I kept a fairly steady focus throughout the winter and wrapped-up the last 20 days on some high notes. Usually I’m a little nervous heading into a race, but for this one, I’m quite relaxed and more so just excited to compete. The fact that I’m not nervous started to make me nervous though. The nerves and fear push me harder, wanting to prove to myself that I can push through and overcome.

So to add that element of “can I do this?” back into the equation, I’m setting a more aggressive goal — to finish within 01:09:00. That’s more than four minutes faster than last year. It may not sound like much because last year I shaved almost 12 minutes off from 2016, but there was a big difference between training in those two years and even a new bike that helped shave a big chunk of time. Comparing 2017 to 2018, I’ll have the same equipment and not as drastic of a training increase.

My Trinona Time Comparison

Trinona 2014

Trinona 2016

Trinona 2017

Swim (0.25 miles)

00:11:29

00:09:27

00:08:19

T1

00:04:44

00:04:07

00:02:35

Bike (11 miles)

00:45:35

00:43:40

00:38:50

T2

00:01:21

00:01:07

00:00:57

Run (3.1 miles)

00:27:17

00:27:54

00:23:39

Total

01:30:25

01:26:13

01:14:19

The aggressive goal is putting some doubt back into my head. How can I shave off that much time? Well, let’s start with the run. I think I’m much faster at this point in the year than I was last year. If I can run close to seven-minute miles, I should be able to shave a minute and a half. Ok, I’m almost halfway there.

Transitions. T2 was awesome last year and hard to get much faster. So the pressure is on to keep that speed. T1 could use some improvement. I’d love to pull that under two minutes, which would save me another 30 seconds. I’ll need to really focus and not stumble after the swim while I gear-up for the bike ride.

I’ve gradually become a better swimmer each year and am feeling as comfortable as I ever have in the water. I’m guessing I’ll still have some level of a panic attack in the water, but I’m working hard to think those calm thoughts and stay focused. I’d love to clock a 07:30 swim time, which would shave almost another minute.

And then there’s the bike leg. That’s where there’s the most opportunity to pick-up speed. However, it’s the sport I’ve spent the least time training in. In order to get faster here I’m just going to have push hard. Plain and simple. That worries me a bit as I don’t want to burn up the legs too much before the run. But if I want to achieve this new goal, I need to be aggressive.

Really, overall, I need to push harder than ever before if I’m going to hit the 01:09:00 goal. That’s the beauty and fun of the sprint distance though – going all out from start to finish. I think this is an aggressive goal. But what’s the fun in achieving a goal if it’s too easy? Just setting this goal has pushed me back outside of my comfort zone. And I like that feeling. I’m back in the unknown, which is the perfect place to prove I’m capable of more than I’ve imagined.

So with all of this said. I think I’m ready. I’ve trained. I’ve picked-up my packet. Applied my stickers. Double-checked my gear. All that’s left is to relax, get some rest and wake-up tomorrow ready to give it all I’ve got.

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Race Recap: 2018 River to Ridge

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The first foot race of the season is under my belt. On May 19, I ran the River to Ridge five-mile race in LaCrosse, WI — finishing with a time of 00:37:46, which was good for third place in my age group (3/24) and fourth place overall (4/143).

The five-mile race starts on the banks of the Mississippi River, winds through swampy river bottoms and finishes with a 600+ ft climb up the bluffs to the top of Hixon Forest. Surfaces range from pavement and gravel to sandy spots and singletrack dirt trails, scattered with rocks and tree roots. Eyes and feet needed to move in synchronized fashion to avoid trips and falls.

I started the race near the front of the pack with the goal of having room to run. Within the first mile, separation of the leaders from the rest of the runners became quickly visible. I was hanging on at the back of the lead pack, somewhere in the top-ten. As each mile passed, I found myself gaining just a little more ground, not realizing how close I was to the front.

Somewhere about halfway through the third mile, the 600+ foot climb up the bluff began. This is where room to run faded for steep and narrow singletrack trails. It’s also where my quads began to feel the burn. But I kept plugging away, maintaining a steady pace — albeit a much slower pace than the sub-sevens I ran during the first three miles. I’d catch-up to a runner in front of me and battle the decision of “should I follow their heals and catch my breath, or should I squeeze past at the first glimpse of a wider section of trail?” I balanced somewhere in-between the two options, not realizing just how close I was to the front of the pack. I savored a few seconds to rest at a slightly easier pace, but then passed when the opportunity of a wider section of trail presented itself.

When I crossed the finish line, I felt like I still had a little in the tank. Not much, but some. That 600+ foot climb kicked my butt. I was amazed to find out I finished fourth overall. A true delight to finish so close to the front.

I’ve since wondered if I could’ve finished higher, especially knowing I was only five seconds behind third place and 14 seconds behind second place. What if I had been more aggressive on the climb? The what ifs are no game to play. Hindsight is 20-20. I ran my race, and I ran it hard. I never expected to finish as high as I did. It was a pleasant surprise and a proud accomplishment.

This was my second time competing in River to Ridge. The first in 2015, finishing with a time of 00:48:08. I skipped participation in 2016, making a morning-of decision due to cold, rainy conditions and I feared risking an injury just weeks before my first triathlon of the season. And then this year I finished in 00:37:46. Pretty wild to look back and see that I shaved almost 11 minutes off of my 2015 time. That’s more than two minutes per mile. Progress I’m oh so proud of.

The icing on the cake was getting to race this event with some great friends — friends that’ll also be racing the Trinona triathlon next weekend. I’m really looking forward to another weekend of laughter, banter and celebration with these guys. Cheers to that!

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Training Update: April and May

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I’ve crafted my blog on milestones and accomplishments, many accompanied by quotes that motivated me during those achievements. It’s easy to talk about things when they’re going well, but not so much when they’re not.

April and May have been rough training months for me. And when I say “training” I mostly mean the lack thereof. I should give myself some credit — I’ve done some things really well. But I’ve also let some things slack.

When I first started reflecting on it, I thought maybe I’d just pass on writing about what did or didn’t happen. I felt like a hypocrite thinking about some of those quotes and how I wasn’t currently applying them to my training efforts. I thought about how this image of myself that I had in my head may not be so accurate. Like I said, it’s a little easier when things are going well.

Then I realized that sometimes the best way to move forward is to be honest with the past, learn from it and then forge ahead. So here it is. My last two months.

Swimming: Ugh. This one is hard to admit. Ok, rip the band-aid off — I haven’t jumped in the pool since March 26. Not even once. No swimming whatsoever. Whew, ok it’s out there now. My goals for this year have been centered around building endurance and tackling longer distances. Swimming is a big part of that. It’s no longer my weakest triathlon leg, but that’s because I’ve worked hard to get better. Up through March, I’d been working on my kick and learning to alternate side breathe, and it was paying off. I was getting more comfortable. I was swimming more yards per session and I felt faster. Then I totally dropped off in April. I don’t know what happened. I really don’t. And I feel pretty guilty about it. I’ve got some serious work to do in the next few weeks, especially since my first triathlon of the year, Trinona, is on June 10. Yikes. I know I’ll be fine, but I want to be fast. I better get to work. Like now.

Cycling: Meh. I’ve done some cycling. But not nearly as much as I should be doing. I’d gotten in a decent routine of attending cyclefit classes on a weekly basis towards the end of winter. And I’ve had my bike out on the road a few times now that the snow finally left for good in mid-April. But I know just a few rides just aren’t enough. Cycling was my weakest leg by far last year. Probably because I practiced it the least. Again, I need to put in more effort here. The good news is at Trinona, I’m doing the sprint distance, so it’s an 11-mile ride. But again, I want to be faster. I need to log some solid rides soon because June 10 is right around the corner.

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Need to spend much more time behind these bars!

Running: Finally, I can share some good news. Running is the one thing I’ve been doing well lately. I’ve ran 110 miles in the last 50 days. I’ve averaged 5.5 miles per run, with a max distance of 8.2 miles. That eight miler happened this past week and I was pretty proud of it because I averaged a sub-eight pace — 07:49 per mile! I’ve ran a few 3 milers and averaged sub-sevens. I’m a lot faster at this point in the season than I was last year, which has me very optimistic for Trinona. The run has always been my strongest leg. And now that I’m used to running longer distances, I’m hoping to let it all loose on the sprint distance 3.1 mile run and have a really strong finish.

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The evening of eight-plus miles at a sub-eight pace.

Whew. Ok. That was my last month and a half. There’s a few things to be proud of, and a few more things that are opportunities for improvement. Opportunities to work a little harder. I keep thinking back to a quote I posted in a recent blog: “Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.” That one is really sticking with me. If I want to achieve what I want to achieve, I’ve got to work a lot harder. Talent can only take me so far.

So, Trinona is only 20 days away. That’s 20 days to work harder. The last 50 days are in the past. I can’t change them. But the next 20 days, well, those are the days I still have control over. I choose the outcome. And you know what I’m going to do? I’m going to use each day to get better — one day at a time.

Fundraising Update: I’m just $150 shy of my $500 Team Save the Children fundraising goal as part of the Minneapolis Triathlon in July. The work that Save the Children does to protect and nurture kiddos around the globe is a constant inspiration and reminder that there is good in the world. They’re helping innocent children gain access to education, health care and nutrition while fighting to save them from poverty, discrimination and violence.

I’d be honored if you joined me in my journey for positive impact. Together, we can help make a child’s life happier, healthier and safer. Together, we can be the difference. Please consider making a donation and visit my personal fundraising page today: www.savethechildren.org/minneapolistri18/joshaverbeck

New Distances in 2018

Blog COver

I kind of thought I’d have this year’s race schedule a little more locked-in by now, but with a few core races decided on and registered for, my 2018 season is starting to take shape.

The plan so far

Trinona | June 10, 2018 | I’ll be kicking-off my triathlon season at the race where it all began for me. Trinona has a special place in my heart and I’ll probably compete in it for as long as I’m able. It’s the first triathlon I ever competed in. It takes place in the beautiful bluff country and river valley of southeastern Minnesota where I grew up. And it’s a race that some of my good friends are competing in now as well, which makes it even more fun with banter before, during and after. This will be my third consecutive year competing at this race, and fourth time overall. In 2017, I missed the podium in my age group by 16 seconds. I’ve registered for the sprint distance once again, with a goal of making this my best Trinona finish yet.

Minneapolis Triathlon | July 14, 2018 | New distance alert. I’ve registered for the International / Olympic distance for this race, which is twice the distance of a sprint. I’ll be swimming 0.93 miles, biking 24.5 miles and running 6.2 miles. I’m pretty excited to be taking my triathlon career to the next level. And I’m even more excited to be doing it as part of Team Save the Children, raising awareness and funds to help support the amazing work they do for children around the world (I’d be honored if you visited my personal fundraising page here). This is sure to be a special race on many levels.

Twin Cities Marathon | October 7, 2018 | Another new distance. Last fall I ran my first half marathon. This fall I’ll be running my first marathon. Tackling this distance wasn’t on my radar until last year. As my overall triathlon goals began trending towards an Ironman within the next few years, I realized I needed to start increasing my distances and exposing myself to the physical and mental challenges that come with them. But exposure to suffering wasn’t the only reason I chose to run a marathon. I’ve heard so many great things about this race specifically from past participants. It’s been dubbed the most beautiful urban marathon in America. It’s well organized and has tremendous fan support. The atmosphere is sure to be electric, providing a spark right when runners need it most.

Yet to be planned

I’d like to get a few running races under the belt prior my first triathlon of the year in June. A few options include the Hot Dash and Goldy’s Run, which both offer 5k and 10-mile options, and the Get in Gear event, which offers a 5k, 10k and half marathon. I’ve raced the Get in Gear 5k the last two April’s, but given my goals for this year, I’d likely target the 10k distance. A ten-miler at the end of March or early April might be a way to start the season with a bang though!

The biggest gap in my schedule is the second half of July through August. I’d really like to do four triathlons again this summer. With two already registered for in the early part of summer, this late summer window is the place to add them. A few local options include the Chisago Lakes Triathlon at the end of July and the Maple Grove Triathlon at the end of August. Or it may be time to look into a long weekend trication.

I was disappointed in learning that Life Time Tri races moved away from being USA Triathlon sanctioned, meaning the Minneapolis Triathlon will no longer be the regional qualifier for USAT nationals in August. I was really hoping to make my first run at the International / Olympic distance as an effort to qualify. However, it’s been a race I’ve always enjoyed and coupled with my opportunity to leverage race efforts as a way to bring positive change for kids around the world through Save the Children, it’s still a race I’ll continue to prioritize.

While I still have some planning left to do, one thing has already become clear — 2018 is going to be a year of new distances and new challenges. It’s going to take me out of my comfort zone. It’s going to push me harder than I’ve trained and competed before. But it’s also going to provide opportunities to get faster, stronger and smarter. The comfort zone is a beautiful place, but nothing ever grows there. I’m ready to see how much farther I can go. Cheers to goals, growth and new experiences in 2018!

Rochesterfest Triathlon on a Whim

RochesterTriRegistration

Two triathlons in seven days? Sure, why not.

It started with a conversation about a friend of a friend who was doing a triathlon on Sunday (which is now tomorrow already). Naturally, I was intrigued. What was the name of the race? Where was it being held? What were the distances? I just wanted to know more out of curiosity. Then I realized I didn’t have any plans for the weekend and was free on Sunday. “Hmmm, were they still accepting registrations?” I wondered.

I jumped on the Rochesterfest Triathlon website and found that they were indeed offering walk-up registrations during packet pick up until the race was full. So that’s what I did. I drove one hour down to Rochester, MN and registered for my second race of the year, exactly one week after Trinona.

Why choose to do this? Well, I figured I could use the open water swim experience as I thought I could’ve done better last weekend. And honestly, it just sounded like fun. That’s what’s really important anyways. Go out, compete and enjoy the experience. It’s pretty simple when stated that way.

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Since this will be my first time participating in the Rochesterfest Triathlon, I drove down to Foster Arrend Park to familiarize myself with the lake and transition area.

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The buoys were already out on the water, but I’m not really sure if they’re in the final spot for tomorrow. The manmade lake looked really calm, which should make for a smooth swim. My only concern is how much the temperature is supposed to drop tonight. With a forecasted air temperature of 62 degrees, I’m not sure if that will also make for cold water temps too. I’ll pack my wetsuit just in case and make a decision in the morning.

RochesterTransition

The transition area construction was well underway but empty of  any bicycles. It was like a two-wheel ghost town. The races I’ve previously competed in have had many athletes racking their bikes the day before the event. So tomorrow morning, the transition will be bustling with activity and all of the athletes rack their bikes, prep their gear and start mentally preparing for the swim – a swim from which I gather is more a “mass” start for each wave versus releasing swimmers in pairs every few seconds. I could be wrong, but I guess I’ll find out at the swim start.

There’s certainly an element of the unknown for me in this race. Except for a few glimpses of the swim course, I know almost nothing about the course. But how could I? I made the decision on Friday night, registered in-person at packet pickup on Saturday afternoon and will be racing on Sunday morning. Not a ton of time to prepare. But in a way, that’s kind of exciting!

Race Recap: Trinona 2017

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Crushing goals, making memories and having fun. That pretty much sums up my Trinona 2017 experience. But one sentence can’t quite capture the awesomeness that was.

First, I got to spend race day with two close friends who were competing in Trinona for the first time (a first tri ever for one friend and a second tri overall for the other). It was a joy to hangout and share banter in transition before the race, walk to the swim start together and ultimately reunite at the finish line to high-five, share stories and celebrate our accomplishments.

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Second, I had the support of many family and friends that showed up to cheer. Running into the lake and embarking on the swim can be a bit of a lonely feeling in my opinion. Sure, I was surrounded by dozens of fellow swimmers who were so close that I’d accidentally run into them or they’d accidentally run into to me, but ultimately it’s up to me to power through to shore. Enveloped in water I can’t hear much except for splashing and my own gasps for air. It’s a huge energy boost to step out of the lake and hear friends and family screaming as I dash to transition. It gets better when hearing them while dismounting the bike for T2. And it’s even better hearing them while closing in on the finish line. Not only did I make it through the race, but I had their support the whole way. That’s pretty special to have others invest that effort.

My TRINONA 2017 Results

Split

Split Pace

Overall Rank

Swim (0.25 miles)

00:08:19

02:04 min/100m

77/285

T1

00:02:35

155/285

Bike (11 miles)

00:38:50

17.00 mi/hr

111/185

T2

00:00:57

21/285

Run (3.1 miles)

00:23:39

07:38 min/mile

39/285

Total

01:14:19

61/285

Third, on a personal note, I crushed the goal I set about a week ago by almost three whole minutes, setting a personal record of 01:14:19! That’s almost 12 minutes faster than my 2016 time and good enough for 61st place out of 285 racers overall. I was faster in every segment of the race over last year.

My Trinona Time Comparison

Trinona 2014

Trinona 2016

Trinona 2017

Swim (0.25 miles)

00:11:29

00:09:27

00:08:19

T1

00:04:44

00:04:07

00:02:35

Bike (11 miles)

00:45:35

00:43:40

00:38:50

T2

00:01:21

00:01:07

00:00:57

Run (3.1 miles)

00:27:17

00:27:54

00:23:39

Total

01:30:25

01:26:13

01:14:19

My swim time was faster than last year by almost a minute, even though I took a few breaks to tread water and catch my breath along the way. When I took those pauses I wasn’t exactly tired but more so just trying to mentally stay calm. Those breaks are a sign that more training is needed before the Minneapolis Triathlon in just a few weeks, which swim distance almost twice as long as Trinona at just under a half-mile. I’m still happy I was faster than last year though. I’ve come along way in my swimming abilities over the last year. The only not so fun part of the swim was passing the last buoy towards shore and grabbing hand fulls of weeds with each stroke. But hey, that’s all part of the experience of swimming in Lake Winona!

I skipped the wetsuit for the swim, which lead to a much improved first transition time. But in comparison to other racers, it was still fairly slow at 00:02:35. I might have to think more about what the heck I’m doing in transition that’s taking up so much time (maybe get better at swimming so I’m not so tired at this point of the race).

The new road bike made a significant difference in this race, shaving off almost five minutes from last year’s bike time. I could feel how much lighter the bike was beneath me as I shifted through gears for efficient pedaling and maximum speeds. Hitting a couple downhills at 30mph was a highlight from the ride.

T2 was a breeze at 0:00:57. Not much more to say about that!

Then came the run. I crushed the run. Seriously. I was more than four minutes faster than last year. Four minutes! I guess it makes sense considering most of my training efforts this year were put into running. I’ve been hovering around 8-minute miles during my training runs. In a 5K race at the end of April, I averaged a 07:29 min/mile pace. At Trinona, I averaged a 07:38 min/mile pace, and that was after swimming and biking. I’m still a little surprised about how much energy I had left for the run, but super stoked about it too.

Crossing the finish line was a real joy. All of the training and preparation came to a conclusion that resulted in a new PR. I’m really, really proud of this race. And after receiving my medal, returning my timing chip and grabbing a bottle of water, I was able to cheer for and watch my buddies cross the finish line. Trinona 2017 was a special day. I’m thankful for the opportunity to compete and share the experience with such amazing people. Cheers friends!

TrinonaFinishers

Trinona: The Day Before

The countdown to Trinona 2017 is down to one. Today was the expo, which features sponsor booths, packet pick-up and pre-race meetings. 

Many of the benches down at the Lake Winona bandshell sat empty as most triathletes opted for shade under a tree or back near the Veteran’s Memorial. I can’t blame them. I was one of them. It was hot and windy out there this afternoon, with temperatures in the mid-90s. 

Speaking of weather, the forecast for race day looks to keep everyone on their toes with the possibility of rain. The race director mentioned his contingency plans in the case weather causes delays. He also said that either way, there will still be a party considering all of the beer from Island City Brewing. Rain or shine, I’m ready to have some fun tomorrow. 

After the meeting, I walked down to the lake to check out the water and see if the course buoys were out yet. Lake Winona is known for its abundant weeds and plant growth in the water. When people ask, “You’re going to swim in that lake?”, I like to reply, “Don’t worry, they’ll probably mow it first!”. As expected, there were plenty of weeds in the water near the shore. Luckily we’ll be swimming out far enough to be in the clear, but it could be interesting going in and coming back onto shore. It’s a small price to pay considering the rest of the beauty of the course. 

I also scoped out the transition area. It’s always good to be familiar with the entrances and exits so you know where to come in from swimming, exit and re-enter with the bike, and exit out to the run course. It was pretty early in the afternoon so the transition was pretty empty, but tomorrow it will be a small village of bikes and people. 

After eating a stereotypical night before the race pasta dinner, I applied my helmet and bike stickers, double-checked and prepared my gear and turned on some tunes to relax. It’s going to be an exciting day tomorrow. I’m excited to be participating in this increasing local triathlon in the town I grew up in. I’m excited to have my family and friends there to cheer me on. I’m excited to have two good friends also participating in the race. I’m excited for this opportunity to compete and have fun. I’m just excited about it all. The hard part is going to be getting some sleep tonight with all that excitement going through my head.

Good luck tomorrow fellow triathletes!